Exciting and beautifully written stories on politics, social movements, photography and books

Tag John Stapleton

The Last Surviving Small Business in New South Wales: Village Fix

Shellharbour is a small coastal town two hours south of Sydney. Only a few short years ago a lost in time surfing village, it is now surging ahead as young families flee the nightmare that Sydney has become. Village Fix… Continue Reading →

Unfolding Catastrophe: Australia. Part Three. The Greatest Mistake In History.

If the geniuses of Australian government weren’t satisfied with all the cautionary voices emerging from some of the world’s most venerable tertiary institutions, they only had to go as far as the Australian National University, to Professor Ramesh Thakur, whose… Continue Reading →

The Tragedy of Australia

By Paul Collits: UK Conservative Woman THE British historian Guy de la Bédoyère claims that ‘Australia is falling apart’. Off Guardian suggests that we are ‘going full fascist’. Daily reports in France, Russia and everywhere in between and beyond, hover between pity, amusement and disbelief. How… Continue Reading →

Unfolding Catastrophe: Australia. The American Podcast: The Land Down Under.

By Nick Asia. MGTOW Chats. Unfolding Catastrophe: Australia aims to dismember the political, administrative and social derangement which has overtaken Australia since the early days of 2020.   Australia’s democracy has proved virus thin. There has never been a more politicised… Continue Reading →

The Burning Ghats of Varanasi: Photography by Russell Shakespeare

People crawl across India to die in Varanasi for one reason: according to the Hindu faith if you die there, on the edge of the sacred Ganges River, you will not be reincarnated. The cycle of life, and therefore of… Continue Reading →

Unfolding Catastrophe: Australia. Speech to Forum organised by the Australian Federation of Islamic Councils.

By John Stapleton Public servants like to talk about “evidence based policy”. Well, where is the evidence that lockdowns work? Australia’s democracy has proved virus thin. There has never been a more politicised and thereby more disastrously mismanaged disease. Eighteen… Continue Reading →

Unfolding Catastrophe: Journalist John Stapleton on the Government’s COVID Response

By Paul Gregoire: Sydney Criminal Lawyers Blog Tensions are high in the Sydney region as the population looks towards its tenth week in lockdown, without any clear understanding of when it will be coming out of the home confinement it’s… Continue Reading →

The Future History of Publishing

Since the beginning of literature technologies have shaped the written word. And thereby publishing technologies have shaped history, culture, politics and war. The adage history is written by the victors has transposed in this truly astonishing era into something else…. Continue Reading →

The Lie at The Heart of Hysteria. Part Two of Unfolding Catastrophe: Australia.

Photography by Dean Sewell. There in that frightened time, Old Alex had believed he was putting his best foot forward, almost as a military instruction, a belief that reason could survive, that democracy, despite all its deformities, was worth saving,… Continue Reading →

By Australia’s Mehi River

The Craft and Art of Jupuul Mari Mehi means girl in the gamilaraay dialect Miyaay. Moree is Mari and Mari means man. That is just the way whitefellas take our language and put it in their phonetic context. Because our… Continue Reading →

The Myth of Black Opal: Lightning Ridge and the Fiery Guardians of Eternal Love

The picture above was taken in 1909, at the height of the what was known as the Three Mile Rush. The bicycle polisher rigged up in the centre of this picture was being used to rub down opal. The commercial… Continue Reading →

Sound Clown: The Music of Ian Purdie

Amazing to me, now that I’m old, is that for such an impatient person I was able to devote the thousands of hours to playing guitar that it takes to become competent on the instrument. It seemed when I was… Continue Reading →

The Triumph of Death: Bruegel The Elder

Death triumphs over the mundane. An army of skeletons raze the Earth. All life is extinguished. The background is a barren landscape in which scenes of destruction are still taking place. In the foreground, Death leads his armies from his… Continue Reading →

The Kashi Vishwanath Express: The Photography of Russell Shakespeare

Apart from walking, one of the slowest ways to travel the 794 kilometres from New Delhi in the state of Uttar Pradesh to Varanasi on the Ganges is the Kashi Vishwanath Express. Multi-award winning Australian news photographer Russell Shakespeare first… Continue Reading →

Sydney’s Song Before Sunrise: The Photography of Tim Ritchie

Crisis turns into salvation at every step. For Tim Ritchie it is literally true. “I am a diabetic and eight years ago my doctor told me to walk 10,000 steps a day, but even then my blood sugar levels were… Continue Reading →

Salman Rushdie: Hunting the Famous

Serious breaches were breaking through the fabric of things. Back in London in the 1980s, I was using my new found status as a freelance journalist to pursue literary idols. The interview with Salman Rushdie took place in the same… Continue Reading →

Gilligan’s Island, Sydney: Borrowed Sorrow

Terror in Australia: Workers’ Paradise Lost On Oxford Street in Central Sydney, where I lived for some months while researching Terror in Australia: Workers’ Paradise Lost, the homeless, were regularly moved on; rough sleepers driven from public view. Drunks, wayward, schizophrenics, Sydney’s… Continue Reading →

India’s Festival of Colours

The Black and White Photography of Russell Shakespeare India’s Holi Festival celebrates the triumph of good over evil. It lasts for a night and a day and erupts in vivid display of colours across the villages, towns and cities of… Continue Reading →

Winter’s Coming Back to Australia: The Photography of Dean Sewell

After one of the worst bush fire seasons in living memory, it’s easy to forget that the previous winter there were snowfalls across parts of Australia that rarely see snow from one year to the next. This piece was originally… Continue Reading →

I Built No Schools in Kenya: Kirsten Drysdale’s Year of Unmitigated Madness

This is not your standard white-girl-in-Africa tale. I fed no babies, I built no schools, I saved no rhinos. Self-discovery came a distant second to self-preservation on this particular adventure. So says Kirsten Drysdale, who is better known as a… Continue Reading →

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