A Sense of Place Magazine

Exciting and beautifully written stories on politics, social movements, photography and books

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Gilligan’s Island, Sydney: Borrowed Sorrow

Terror in Australia: Workers’ Paradise Lost On Oxford Street in Central Sydney, where I lived for some months while researching Terror in Australia: Workers’ Paradise Lost, the homeless, were regularly moved on; rough sleepers driven from public view. Drunks, wayward, schizophrenics, Sydney’s… Continue Reading →

Fermi’s Other Paradox

In the summer of 1950, four nuclear physicists were walking to lunch from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Their names were Emil Konopinski, Herbert York, Edward Teller, and Enrico Fermi. One of them was not human. On… Continue Reading →

A Rare Bird — The Black Swan

By David Haworth, Monash University The black swan is an Australian icon. The official emblem of Western Australia, depicted in the state flag and coat-of-arms, it decorates several public buildings. The bird is also the namesake for Perth’s Swan River,… Continue Reading →

AI could cause ‘1984 by 2024’, says Microsoft President

George Orwell’s dystopian vision of the world in Nineteen Eighty-Four “could come to pass in 2024” if artificial intelligence is not better regulated, the President of Microsoft has warned. A new documentary shines light on the dark side of artificial… Continue Reading →

Radicals — Remembering the Sixties

Extract: By Meredith Burgmann and Nadia Wheatley  We stand in Sydney’s Town Hall Square, two women in our seventies, holding handwritten placards. Meredith’s says, ‘Remember John Pat. 1966–1984’. Nadia’s says, ‘Solidarity! Black Lives Matter’.  We have stood here before, many… Continue Reading →

India’s Festival of Colours

The Black and White Photography of Russell Shakespeare India’s Holi Festival celebrates the triumph of good over evil. It lasts for a night and a day and erupts in vivid display of colours across the villages, towns and cities of… Continue Reading →

Winter’s Coming Back to Australia: The Photography of Dean Sewell

After one of the worst bush fire seasons in living memory, it’s easy to forget that the previous winter there were snowfalls across parts of Australia that rarely see snow from one year to the next. This piece was originally… Continue Reading →

Introducing Australotitan: Australia’s Largest Dinosaur

By Scott Hucknull, University of Melbourne. Today, a new Aussie dinosaur is being welcomed into the fold. Our study published in the journal PeerJ documents Australotitan cooperensis – Australia’s largest dinosaur species ever discovered, and the largest land-dwelling species to… Continue Reading →

The Intellectual Clout Behind The Anti-Lockdown Movement

With Professor Ramesh Thakur In the lockdown insanity which has gripped the Australian political class one of the country’s most distinguished academics, Professor Ramesh Thakur of the Australian National University, has stood out for his bold, erudite and highly intelligent… Continue Reading →

I Built No Schools in Kenya: Kirsten Drysdale’s Year of Unmitigated Madness

This is not your standard white-girl-in-Africa tale. I fed no babies, I built no schools, I saved no rhinos. Self-discovery came a distant second to self-preservation on this particular adventure. So says Kirsten Drysdale, who is better known as a… Continue Reading →

Cops For Covid Truth: The Best of 2020.

An Open Letter to Michael Fuller, Police Commissioner of New South Wales Concerning the Police Enforcement of Ongoing COVID-19 restrictions Illustrated by Michael Fitzjames We are writing to you to raise concerns we have about the use of the police… Continue Reading →

A Homage to Warren Clarke

Photo-Journalist, Inveterate Traveler: The Best of Our Archives Warren Clarke was known for his high adventurism. Whether on assignment or not, he trekked to places no other photographer wanted to go. In recent years he had become fascinated by India;… Continue Reading →

Scott-free no more? Why the prime minister’s smooth media run may be coming to an end

By Denis Muller, University of Melbourne. Katharine Murphy, The Guardian Australia’s political editor, marvelled recently that Scott Morrison pulls what she called a “Jedi mind trick”, rebadging disasters as triumphs – and getting away with it. I don’t know enough… Continue Reading →

Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism

Extract: Angus Deaton and Anne Case From Nobel Prize winning economist Angus Deaton and leading academic Anne Case comes a beautifully written, concise, accessible and groundbreaking study of the collapse of America’s working class and the profound political consequences that… Continue Reading →

Breakthrough Aussie War Drone May Target Civilian Protestors

By Michelle Fahy: Michael West Media An Australian breakthrough in drone technology that makes it easier to locate hidden enemy on the battlefield could also be used to target civilian protesters. The US government has already used surveillance drones to monitor… Continue Reading →

Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission Thinks there are No Legitimate Uses of Encryption. They’re Wrong.

By Gernot Heiser, Lyria Bennett Moses, UNSW and Vanessa Teague, ANU. Australia’s parliament is considering legislation to give new powers to the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) and the Australian Federal Police. These powers will allow them to modify online… Continue Reading →

Bloody Colonials: Extract

By Stafford Sanders. The latest from A Sense of Place Publishing. “Halloran!” barked Bascombe as we drew up in front of the stables. There was no immediate response to this, so he repeated more loudly: “Halloran!” And for good measure,… Continue Reading →

Advice Being Tailored For Political, Not Medical, Purposes

By Jack Waterford: Pearls and Irritations Scott Morrison has repeatedly reiterated that all decisions in relation to Coronavirus public health measures have been taken in accordance with medical advice. But the advice itself has frequently been considerably less than transparent,… Continue Reading →

The Tasmanian Tiger Was No Wolfish Predator

By Douglass S. Rovinsky, Alistair Evans and Justine W. Adams, Monash University The thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger, is an Aussie icon. It was the largest historical marsupial predator and a powerful example of human-caused extinction…. Continue Reading →

The Enemies of Freedom Double-down

By TOTT News Vaccination passports may soon be required for Australians to travel interstate, Prime Minster Scott Morrison has announced in an interview. The comments come as vaccine hesitancy continues to grow across the country, with more citizens beginning to… Continue Reading →

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