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Africa: World Press Photo Foundation

The 6×6 Global Talent Program from the World Press Photo Foundation recognises six visual storytellers from six global regions, to highlight talent from around the world and present stories with diverse perspectives. Launched in 2018, the initiative completed its first cycle last… Continue Reading →

The Australian Strategic Policy Institute Behind Push for More Defence Spending

By Marcus Reubenstein with Michael West Media Funded by the Department of Defence, the Australia Strategic Policy Institute collects millions more as it drives the “China threat” narrative. As Marcus Reubenstein reports, while ASPI is the media’s go-to experts for public comment,… Continue Reading →

Jumpers at the Currumbin Valley Rock Pools: The Photography of Russell Shakespeare

“For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return.” Leonardo da Vinci The Currumbin Valley Rock Pools are about five minutes… Continue Reading →

Ancient Aboriginal Archaeological Site Preserved on Seabed

By Jonathan Benjamin, Flinders University; Geoff Bailey, University of York; Jo McDonald, University of Western Australia; Michael O’Leary, University of Western Australia and Sean Ulm, James Cook University For most of the human history of Australia, sea levels were much… Continue Reading →

Hidden Hand: Exposing How the Chinese Communist Party is Reshaping the World

Preface by Clive Hamilton and Mareike Ohlberg The comforting belief that democratic freedoms have history on their side and will eventually prevail everywhere has always been tinged with wishful thinking. World events of the past two or three decades have… Continue Reading →

Thailand: The Varieties of Expatriate Experience

The Tartan Pimpernel Walter ‘Whacky’ Douglas looked like he was having a fine old time when he was arrested and deported from Thailand in 2014. Douglas, known as “The Tartan Pimpernel” and once described as one of Britain’s ten wealthiest… Continue Reading →

Huge Locust Swarms Threaten Food Security

By Leisa Armstrong of Edith Cowan University In recent months, food security concerns have emerged for nations across Africa, Asia and the Middle East, as swarms of desert locusts wreak havoc on crops. While the same level of damage isn’t… Continue Reading →

The Daughter of Siberian Shamans

Yakutsk is the coldest place on Earth. Winter temperatures plunge below minus 50 degrees Centigrade. The town of Oymyakom, in the East Siberian Depression, has recorded temperatures well below of minus 60. The indigenous tribes of this most hostile of… Continue Reading →

Men’s Lives Do Not Matter: The Virus of Government Misandry

By Augusto Zimmerman All the worst elements of Australian governance have been released during the so-called “Pandemic”. Every little autocrat in the country is telling you where to sit, where to stand, where you can and cannot go, how many… Continue Reading →

Drought-breaking Rains Transform Critically Endangered Woodlands

By Jacqui Sol, CSIRO; Annie Kelly, and Suzanne Prober, CSIRO In box gum grassy woodlands, widely spaced eucalypts tower over carpets of wildflowers, lush native grasses and groves of flowering wattles. It’s no wonder some early landscape paintings depicting Australian… Continue Reading →

Bill Gates and the Mark of the Beast

By The Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s International Cyber Policy Centre Against the backdrop of the global Covid-19 pandemic, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates has become the subject of a diverse and rapidly expanding universe of conspiracy theories.  As an example, a… Continue Reading →

Driving the Australian Economy off a Cliff

By Tarric Brooker with Independent Australia A huge number of Australians will be plunged into poverty overnight as others get to renovate their homes — courtesy of Australian Government programs. Tarric Brooker reports. Prime Minister Scott Morrison has begun pulling back stimulus measures, despite… Continue Reading →

Bird-brained and Brilliant

By Gisela Kaplan, University of New England Calling someone a “bird brain” is not usually meant as a compliment. But as research continues to reveal, birds are much smarter than was once thought. Australian birds are arguably among the smartest… Continue Reading →

Twitter Censors Trump for “Threat Of Harm” but has No Problem with Threats to Bomb Foreigners

By Caitlin Johnstone Twitter has censored a post by the president of the United States, this time for “a threat of harm against an identifiable group.” This despite the fact that this president routinely uses the popular social media platform… Continue Reading →

Australia: The Most Oppressive of all Western Democracies

By Alison Broinowski with Pearls & Irritations When there’s a concerted attack on the interests of the Australian mainstream media they will rise in joint defence of journalists’ freedom. But they are slow to support five other Australians who have… Continue Reading →

Salman Rushdie: Hunting the Famous

Serious breaches were breaking through the fabric of things. Back in London in the 1980s, I was using my new found status as a freelance journalist to pursue literary idols. The interview with Salman Rushdie took place in the same… Continue Reading →

The Myth of Black Opal: Lightning Ridge and the Fiery Guardians of Eternal Love

The picture above was taken in 1909, at the height of the what was known as the Three Mile Rush. The bicycle polisher rigged up in the centre of this picture was being used to rub down opal. The commercial… Continue Reading →

Australia’s Crony Capitalism: Government Fights Off Move to Shut Loophole for Old-Money Billionaires

By Michael West The Government has grovelled to its billionaire donors yet again, killing a Senate amendment to force the richest Australians to disclose their financial statements. Michael West reports on the crusade by independent senator Rex Patrick to hold the Morrison… Continue Reading →

Jenny Hocking: Why My Battle for Access to the ‘Palace Letters’ Should Matter to all Australians

Professor Jenny Hocking recently won her longstanding campaign for the National Archives of Australia to release the so-called “Palace letters” about the dismissal of Gough Whitlam in 1975. This is her account of that campaign. In August 1975, speaking at… Continue Reading →

Alfred W. McCoy: What I Learnt From Fifty Years of Writing About Drugs

We live in a time of change, when people are questioning old assumptions and seeking new directions. In the ongoing debate over health care, social justice, and border security, there is, however, one overlooked issue that should be at the… Continue Reading →

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